Dark Days, Depression and ‘The Droop’

4.6 billion years ago a swirling mass of gas and dust collapsed in upon itself and spun together to form our sun. Skip forward the formation of the solar system, the doomed first life on earth, one mass extinction, the ice age, the pyramids, Leonardo da Vinci, X factor and the London Olympics; and we find ourselves at the present day. After all this time the sun is still the most important thing in the Universe. And we’re still trying to figure out exactly how it works.

The sun can affect your body in all kinds of ways. It can improve your mood, tan your skin, stimulate sexual desire and even make you feel like you’ve got more energy. Steeped in the middle of winter, as we are, you might not be seeing as much of the sun as you’d like to. And perhaps you’re feeling the physical effects.

When human skin is exposed to sunlight it converts some of the ultraviolet energy contained in the light to a precursor of vitamin D3. This allows the body to make the vitamin D it needs to stay healthy and balanced.

But what does this have to do with depression, or men’s health for that matter?

Well, studies have found a strong relationship between low vitamin D levels in the blood, and depression and ‘the droop’. So, for those of us who live in countries where we get less sunshine during the winter months (or just those of us who live under a permanent cloud – sorry Swindon) we have to make sure to find other ways of getting enough vitamin D.

You may have heard of Seasonal Affective Disorder (or SAD); a condition where individuals experience the symptoms of depression during particular seasons – usually the winter.

Dark Days - The Wellman Clinic

While we know that sunlight increases the levels of vitamin D in the blood – this doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s low vitamin D that causes this drop in mood. Several studies however have reported that after a regular period of taking oral vitamin D supplements, subjects who identified as ‘depressed’ marked a significant improvement in their mood.

Vitamin D and erectile dysfunction

Vitamin D has been shown to have a positive effect on testosterone levels – men with higher levels of vitamin D in their blood are shown to have higher levels of testosterone than men with vitamin D deficiencies.

More important is the direct effect of vitamin D on your body’s ability to get an erection. Insufficient levels of vitamin D can result in the body producing superoxide ions at a greater speed. These free radicals deplete your body’s stores of nitric oxide – a vital molecule for helping your blood vessels to relax and your penis to become erect.

If you feel like you’re suffering from any of the effects of vitamin D deficiency, there are options. The best solution is, of course, booking a month long holiday in the Bahamas and soaking up some sun on the beach. But, if your wallet can’t face that kind of hit at this time of the year a much cheaper and easier option is taking vitamin D supplements.

While we can’t promise that they will provide a miracle cure for dark days, depression or ‘the droop’ – taking vitamin D supplements is a great way of ensuring that you get enough of this valuable vitamin and giving your body a good chance of staying balanced and healthy, no matter how dark the days get. And if you still feel like you need a little more help getting back on top, why not check-in for a consultation at The Wellman Clinic? We can help you identify the cause, and find the solution for all of your health concerns.

Isabel

P.S. Vitamin D also boosts the immune system significantly; inhabitants of equatorial countries do not suffer seasonal diseases. Last year the flu vaccine was tantamount to useless – vitamin D at 2000 IU applied daily in the all important Organic Oil Solution would have been far superior. It costs tuppence, so take it!

(I don’t think I would have dared to call my daughter that!)
R.P.

References
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/reading-between-the-headlines/201307/vitamin-d-deficiency-and-depression
http://www.menshealth.com/health/erectile-dysfunction-risks

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